When loading this page in Central Administration, I was being presented with a Excel Services error and a correlation ID.

Looking at the ULS logs I noticed the following error.

Insufficient SQL database permissions for user 'Name: <DOMAIN\USERNAME> SID: <SID-CODE> ImpersonationLevel: None' in database '<DATABASE-NAME>' on SQL Server instance '<SQL-INSTANCE>'. Additional error information from SQL Server is included below. The EXECUTE permission was denied on the object 'proc_ReturnWebFeatures', database '<DATABASE-NAME>', schema 'dbo'. 1d0d479c-5a36-c0dc-912b-5bc267b09a0a

The database name was referring to the Content Admin database of Central Administration and the user name was referring to the service application account that the PowerPivot service application had been configured to run under.

The proc_ReturnWebFeatures stored procedure required the user to be a member of the SPDataAccess role to allow EXECUTE permissions. The service application user was only in the WSS_Content_Application_Pools role.

If you run the following script, this will grant the correct rights in the database

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$url = "[http://centraladminsite:2013](http://centraladminsite:2013)"
$webApp = Get-SPWebApplication -Identity $url
$webApp.GrantAccessToProcessIdentity("DOMAIN\serviceapplicationuser")

Now when you load up the PowerPivot Management Dashboard, you report should be displayed.

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This turned out to be harder than I thought.

Metadata navigation and per-location views are an little known, but powerful way of making lists more useful.

It allows you to assign a default view and others views to a folder, content type or field. My need was to allow users to navigate using a Taxonomy field. Dependent on the selected field, I would like to show different fields using a view.

The first part is to add the Metadata navigation.

This is done by creating a hierarchy using MetadataNavigationHierarchy

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var list = SPContext.Current.Web.Lists.TryGetList("MyList");
var field = list .Fields.TryGetFieldByStaticName("MyField");
var settings = MetadataNavigationSettings.GetMetadataNavigationSettings(list); var hierarchy = settings.FindConfiguredHierarchy(field.Id);

if (hierarchy == null) {
hierarchy = new MetadataNavigationHierarchy(field); settings.AddConfiguredHierarchy(hierarchy);
}

MetadataNavigationSettings.SetMetadataNavigationSettings(list, settings);

The hard part is adding the settings for the per location views.

This can only be done by injecting XML into the settings XML. MetadataNavigationSettings is a wrapper class around an XML snippet that is stored in a hidden property of the root folder of the list.

Have a look at SPList.RootFolder.Properties["client_MOSS_MetadataNavigationSettings"]

The XML Schema is as follows. Haven’t found anything documenting this schema on MSDN yet, so this is just taken from my configuration of my list, so may differ on yours

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<MetadataNavigationSettings SchemaVersion="1" IsEnabled="True" AutoIndex="True"> 
<NavigationHierarchies>
<FolderHierarchy HideFoldersNode="True" />
<MetadataField FieldID="a96cea49-ef78-4bfa-8a69-2c49071155fb" FieldType="TaxonomyFieldType" CachedName="Legal_x0020_Document_x0020_Category" CachedDisplayName="Legal Document Category">
<ViewSettings UniqueNodeId="eadcb112-33af-4700-ad11-8e6afbd800e6">
<View ViewId="4f4d05f4-046f-4bfa-a37c-170847fd4e34" CachedName="My Custom View" Index="0" CachedUrl="Store/Forms/My Custom View.aspx" />
<View ViewId="a1ab958f-40d5-4e4a-ac3f-a10bc3cd22d2" CachedName="My Other Custom View" Index="1" CachedUrl="Store/Forms/AllItems.aspx" />
<View ViewId="5c9447a3-ff59-419a-92b1-c7f0191d6f82" CachedName="Not visisible view" Index="-1" CachedUrl="Store/Forms/Not visisible view.aspx" />
</ViewSettings>
</MetadataField>
</NavigationHierarchies>
<KeyFilters />
<ManagedIndices>
<ManagedIndex IndexID="a96cea49-ef78-4bfa-8a69-2c49071155fb" IndexFieldName="Legal_x0020_Document_x0020_Category" IndexFieldID="a96cea49-ef78-4bfa-8a69-2c49071155fb" />
</ManagedIndices>
<ViewSettings UniqueNodeId="">
<View ViewId="a1ab958f-40d5-4e4a-ac3f-a10bc3cd22d2" CachedName="All Documents" Index="0" CachedUrl="Store/Forms/AllItems.aspx" />
</ViewSettings>
</MetadataNavigationSettings>

The part I’m interested in here is the ViewSettings and View tag. The UniqueId attribute relates to the GUID of the selected Term GUID. So this will show the views defined using the View tag when the Term is selected in the Metadata navigation.

If a View tag is added with 0 index this will be used as the default view when the term is selected, all other positive numbers will be shown in the order defined as other available views for that Term. Any negatives will not be available (You don’t need to add them)

I used the following code to add these nodes programmaticallty using XLinq

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var list = SPContext.Current.Web.Lists.TryGetList("MyList"); 
var view = list.Views.Cast().SingleOrDefault(v => v.Title == "MyView");
var session = new TaxonomySession(SPContext.Current.Site);
var field = list.Fields.TryGetFieldByStaticName("MyField");
var term = session.GetTerm("a96cea49-ef78-4bfa-8a69-2c49071155fb");
var settings = MetadataNavigationSettings.GetMetadataNavigationSettings(list); var doc = XDocument.Parse(settings.SettingsXml);

var metaDataField =
(
from f in doc.Descendants("MetadataField")
let fieldId = f.Attribute("FieldID")
where fieldId != null && fieldId.Value == field.Id.ToString()
select f
).SingleOrDefault();

if (metaDataField != null)
{
var viewSettings =
(
from v in metaDataField.Elements("ViewSettings")
let uniqueNodeId = v.Attribute("UniqueNodeId")
where uniqueNodeId != null && uniqueNodeId.Value == term.Id.ToString() select v
).SingleOrDefault();

if (viewSettings == null)
{
metaDataField.Add(
new XElement("ViewSettings",
new XAttribute("UniqueNodeId", term.Id.ToString()),
new XElement("View",
new XAttribute("ViewId", view.ID.ToString()),
new XAttribute("CachedName", view.Title),
new XAttribute("Index", "0"),
new XAttribute("CachedUrl", view.Url)
)
)
);
}
}

settings = new MetadataNavigationSettings(doc.ToString()); MetadataNavigationSettings.SetMetadataNavigationSettings(list, settings);

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THIS IS VERY BAD. WE ALL KNOW THAT MAKING DIRECT UPDATES TO THE DATABASE WILL CREATE SOME SORT OF BLACK HOLE AND KITTENS DIE IN REDMOND ETC, ETC. I HAVEN’T TESTED THE LONG TERM EFFECTS AND ONLY DID THIS ON MY DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT TO GET ME OUT OF A PICKLE.

Disclaimer over.

If you ever get this error when trying to update a field, either through the web UI or programmatic-ally it normally means your Version fields are out of sync. This can occur if your field has been created using the Schema XML from another environment or you have migrated content using some dodgy 3rd party app.

Run this update on your content databases and you all should be good again.

UPDATE [MyContentDatabase].[dbo].[ContentTypes] SET [Version] = CAST([Definition] AS XML).value('(/Field/@Version)[1]', 'int') WHERE CAST([Definition] AS XML).value('(/Field/@Version)[1]', 'int') <> [Version]

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I had a need to show the path of terms, starting from a specific term and then showing the path to the final children.

This would involve traversing the structure as the depth is unknown, so I wrote this piece of code to accomplish this using the Client Components.

Please feel free to steal and improve (Only if you give back the improved code though!)

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private IEnumerable<Path> Paths(bool includeRoot, Guid termId, string siteUrl)
{
var paths = new List<Path>();

Action<ClientContext, Term, String> traverse = null;

traverse = (context, term, path) =>
{
context.Load(term, t => t.Id, t => t.Name, t => t.Terms);
context.ExecuteQuery();

if(!(term.Id == termId && !includeRoot))
path += path == string.Empty ? term.Name : " > {0}".ToFormat(term.Name);

if (term.Terms.Count == 0)
{
paths.Add(new Path
{
TermId = term.Id,
PathText = path
});
}
else
{
foreach(var st in term.Terms)
{
traverse(context, st, path);
}
}
};

using(var context = new ClientContext(siteUrl))
{
var rootTerm = TaxonomySession.GetTaxonomySession(context).GetTerm(termId);

traverse(context, rootTerm, string.Empty);
}

return paths;
}

public class Path
{
public Guid TermId
{
get;
set;
}

public string PathText
{
get;
set;
}
}

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If you have a field called “Folder” it will not be available in the returned ListItem object

e.g. listItem["Folder"].ToString()

The inner workings of the ListItem object uses an ExpandoObject to store the properties. It seems it mixes this up in the FieldValues Collection with all your custom fields. The Folder property then takes the value from the FieldValues collection to make it available to the Folder property. Thus making your own Folder field “disappear”

Here is how you can replicate it.

  • Create a list based on the Custom List template
  • Add a column called “Folder” and make it a text field
  • Add a column called “DisplayName” and make it a text field
  • Add a column called “MyField” and make it a text field

Add a couple of dummy rows of data

Create a console application in VS that references Microsoft.SharePoint.Client and Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Runtime

Add the following code to the Main method

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using (var context = new ClientContext("http://siteurl"))
{
var query = CamlQuery.CreateAllItemsQuery();
var listItems = context.Web.Lists.GetByTitle("Testing").GetItems(query);

context.Load(listItems);
context.ExecuteQuery();

foreach (var listItem in listItems)
{
Console.WriteLine("Title: {0}", listItem["Title"]);
Console.WriteLine("Folder: {0}", listItem["Folder"]);
Console.WriteLine("DisplayName: {0}", listItem["DisplayName"]);
Console.WriteLine("MyField: {0}", listItem["MyField"]);
}
}

Here is the code from .Net Reflector that shows the ListItem object populating the properties. It’s also worth noting that the other properties detailed in this method will have the same problem, but it’s unlikely that you’ll call a field FileSystemObject!

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protected override bool InitOnePropertyFromJson(string peekedName, JsonReader reader)
{
bool flag = base.InitOnePropertyFromJson(peekedName, reader);
if (!flag)
{
switch (peekedName)
{
case "AttachmentFiles":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("AttachmentFiles", this.AttachmentFiles, reader);
this.AttachmentFiles.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "ContentType":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("ContentType", this.ContentType, reader);
this.ContentType.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "DisplayName":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.ObjectData.Properties["DisplayName"] = reader.ReadString();
return flag;

case "EffectiveBasePermissions":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.ObjectData.Properties["EffectiveBasePermissions"] = reader.Read<BasePermissions>();
return flag;

case "EffectiveBasePermissionsForUI":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.ObjectData.Properties["EffectiveBasePermissionsForUI"] = reader.Read<BasePermissions>();
return flag;

case "FieldValuesAsHtml":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("FieldValuesAsHtml", this.FieldValuesAsHtml, reader);
this.FieldValuesAsHtml.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "FieldValuesAsText":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("FieldValuesAsText", this.FieldValuesAsText, reader);
this.FieldValuesAsText.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "FieldValuesForEdit":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("FieldValuesForEdit", this.FieldValuesForEdit, reader);
this.FieldValuesForEdit.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "File":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("File", this.File, reader);
this.File.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "FileSystemObjectType":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.ObjectData.Properties["FileSystemObjectType"] = reader.ReadEnum<FileSystemObjectType>();
return flag;

case "Folder":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("Folder", this.Folder, reader);
this.Folder.FromJson(reader);
return flag;

case "Id":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.ObjectData.Properties["Id"] = reader.ReadInt32();
return flag;

case "ParentList":
flag = true;
reader.ReadName();
base.UpdateClientObjectPropertyType("ParentList", this.ParentList, reader);
this.ParentList.FromJson(reader);
return flag;
}
}
return flag;
}

Here’s a link in TechNet Forums to the initial discussion and a link to the reported bug

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There are two types of ampersands that you need to be aware of when playing with SharePoint Taxonomy

Our favorite and most loved

& ASCII Number: 38

And the impostor

& ASCII Number: 65286

After reading this article by Nick Hobbs, it became apparent that when you create a term it replaces the 38 ampersand with a 65286 ampersand.

This then becomes a problem if you want to do a comparison with your original source (spreadsheet, database, etc) as they are no longer the same.

As detailed in Nick’s article, you can use the TaxonomyItem.NormalizeName method to create a “Taxonomy” version of your string for comparison.

Below is the code I used in the SharePoint 2013 Client Component which is a little different from the server code.

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string myString = "This contains &";

using(var context = new ClientContext("http://myurl"))
{
var result = TaxonomyItem.NormalizeName(context, myString);

context.ExecuteQuery();

string normalisedString = result.Value;
}

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Author's picture

Toby Statham

Independent Office 365 / SharePoint Specialist and an associate consultant at aiimi.com, an Information Management company.

Independent Office 365 / SharePoint Specialist

Brighton, UK